Personal


A life worth living includes hobbies, learnings and other aspects. Here's a collection of resources relating to what I do in my free time.


Reading

My recommended readings for each year. This includes personal preferences, bias for new topics and (I'm a huge fan of) re-reads. They are listed here in no particular order.

Top 10 Reads

Oh 2020. What a year eh?! After falling behind at the start of the year due to increasing workload, the lockdown became a space for exploration of hobbies (hands up everyone who got into cooking/baking/coding/running). I highly recommend Samin Nosrat's S,F,A,H (see below) for a good primer on cooking, and perhaps enjoyed G,O,P too much due to the perfect combination of Spain, travel and food.

While doing an intership as a strategy consultant, I found Michael Porter's work way more accessible when you have time to digest it. And if you are looking for ways to understand and appreciate the world around you - How to Invent Everything, The Body and Genome are fantastic. Looking forward to next year for obvious reasons but also to branch out to more topics beyond business reads!

  1. The Metamorphosis - Frank Kafka
  2. The Almanack of Naval Ravikant - Eric Jorgenson
  3. Awareness - Anthony de Mello
  4. How to Invent Everything - Ryan North
  5. Our Iceberg is Melting - John Kotter
  6. Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat - Samin Nosrat
  7. The Little Book of Stoicism - Jonas Salzgeber
  8. Grape, Olive, Pig - Matt Goulding
  9. The Body - Bill Bryson
  10. Genome - Matt Ridley
Bonus
  • Competitive Strategy & Competitive Advantage - Michael Porter
  • Running Learn - Ash Maurya
  • The Elements of Style - William Strunk

Top 10 Reads

A year with many changes (MBA, Job, Cities), meant that reading took a backseat. However, managed quite a bit of momentum (creeped past a century at 101) especially whent travelling. Naturally, read a lot on the new job - operations and culture were a big portion of the reading, as well as class related - economics and strategy.

Also, it became clear how different reading for pleasure and reading for need (Eg. Class) was different. Nonetheless, always interesting to explore new topics and I found myself very passionate about new topics like strategy and operations. Enjoy!

  1. Talking to Strangers - Malcolm Gladwell
  2. The Uninhabitable Earth - David Wallace-Wells
  3. Raise Your Game - Alan Stein Jr.
  4. Salt: A World History - Mark Kurlansky
  5. Can't Hurt Me - David Goggins
  6. Execution - Larry Bossidy
  7. Trust Me, I'm Lying - Ryan Holiday
  8. Inspired - Marty Cagan
  9. One Plus One Equals Three - David Trott
  10. The Goal - Eliyahu M. Goldratt
Bonus
  • Reinventing Organisations - Frederic Laloux
  • The Ladybird Book of Dating - Jason Hazeley
  • Trillion Dollar Coach - Eric Schmidt
  • UCB Comedy Improv Manual - Matt Besser

Top 10 Reads

In an attempt to break out of the routine reads and the top lists elsewhere, I took in a few lesser known titles this year. Among the 110, there were a few autobiographies and quite a few different health related books. My relationship with sleep and certain food stuffs has changed tremendously after reading further. And oh man, where has George Orwell been all my life?

  1. Survival of the Prettiest - Nancy L. Etcoff
  2. The Blank Slate - Steven Pinker
  3. The Inner Game of Tennis* - W. Timothy Gallwey
  4. Living Within Limits - Garrett Hardin
  5. Why We Sleep - Matthew Walker
  6. Superforecasting - Philip E. Tetlock
  7. Animal Farm - George Orwell
  8. Everybody Lies - Seth Stephens-Davidowitz
  9. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry - Neil deGrasse Tyson
  10. As Little Design As Possible - Sophie Lovell
Bonus
  • The Book of Tea - Kakuzo Okakura
  • 1984 - George Orwell

*re-read

Top 10 Reads

This year I dabbled a little bit in some excellent fiction (American Gods, Pride & Prejudice, *cough* *cough* Crazy Rich Asians) and books that were contemplative in nature. First time breaking the 100 books per year mark at 111.

History was also a focal point, and I highly suggest everyone to try to read books that give you perspectives on different levels - macro, regional, national, industry. And if you've never read anything other than your local textbook on local history, try picking up one from a foreign author - you might just discover something new. Enjoy!

  1. Moonwalking with Einstein - Joshua Foer
  2. The Lessons of History - Will Durant
  3. The Halo Effect - Philip M. Rosenzweig
  4. Goodbye Things - Fumio Sasaki
  5. High Output Management - Andrew S. Grove
  6. Born To Run - Christopher McDougall
  7. Between the World and Me - Ta-Nehisi Coates
  8. The Non-Designers Design Book - Robin P. Williams
  9. When Breath Becomes Air - Paul Kalinithi
  10. Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
Bonus
  • Guns, Germs & Steel - Jared Diamond
  • A Histotry of the World in 6 Glasses - Tom Standage
  • Born a Crime - Trevor Noah
  • Prisoners of Geography - Tim Marshall
  • Algorithms to Live By - Brian CHristian

Top 10 Reads

This year was a very tough list to narrow down, with many excellent books making part of the 92 considered for the year. A few brilliant ones narrowly missed the cut, like Surely, Your Joking Mr Feynman!, So Good They Can't Ignore You and Poor Charlie's Almanack. There was an extra focus on design and general thinking among the list as I was trying to pick up design for work, and engaging meta-learning before learning. Enjoy.

  1. Shoe Dog - Phil Knight
  2. Thinking with Type - Ellen Lupton
  3. Steve Jobs - Walter Isaacson
  4. The Hard Thing About Hard Things - Ben Horowitz
  5. The Design of Everyday Things - Donald A. Norman
  6. Fooled by Randomness - Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  7. Sapiens - Yuval Noah Harari
  8. Modern Romance - Aziz Ansari
  9. Thank You For Arguing - Jay Heinrichs
  10. Salt, Sugar, Fat - Michael Moss
Bonus
  • Getting Things Done - David Allen
  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World - Jack Weatherford

User Bio Card
Hobbies